Events

Take a look at some of our upcoming events, including our Technology Open Day.

Events Calendar

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Upcoming events

Today is Cyber Monday

30 - 30 November 2020

After Black Friday – today is Cyber Monday.

If you’re doing any Christmas shopping – or any shopping for that matter – remember that you can raise funds for Sight Life when you are doing so. You can get your retail therapy fix and generate funds to support Sight Life’s work whenever you shop online at these websites.

Amazon Smile

Instead of using the normal Amazon website, just use Amazon Smile when you shop. Select Sight Life as the charity you wish to support and shop as normal. When you make your purchase, Amazon will make a donation to Sight Life at absolutely no cost to you. If you’re registered for Amazon Prime, you can even use your Amazon Prime benefits for free delivery.

Easy Fundraising

Easy fundraising is completely free service which allows you to shop with your all of your favourite online stores and raise funds for charity at no extra cost to you.

How to do it

To start please register with easyfundraising.org.uk  and select Sight Life as your charity. Registration is completely free.

Next, log in to easyfundraising.org.uk using your username / password (this is how the system recognises who you are and which cause you want to support when you make purchases)

Finally, click any of the retailer links provided – and then shop just as you would normally. There are over 4,000 online stores currently taking part and each purchase you make will generate a cashback donation to Sight Life. All your favourite fashion stores are there, including John Lewis, Marks and Spencer, Debenhams and Clarks. You can also get your takeaway from Domino’s or Just Eat, and buy the wine to go with it from Majestic Wines.

That’s all you need to do – apart from remembering to return to the Easy Fundraising site the next time you are going to shop online.

So what are you waiting for? Get clicking!

Today is International Day of Persons with Disabilities Day

3 December 2020

The International Day of Persons with Disabilities seeks to empower the rights of persons with disabilities.The day also aims to draw attention to the benefits to society as a whole of including persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

On December 3 this year, during the annual celebration of people with disabilities, the 2020 theme ‘Not all Disabilities are Visible’ also focuses on spreading awareness and understanding of disabilities that are not immediately apparent, such as mental illness, chronic pain or fatigue, sight or hearing impairments, diabetes, brain injuries, neurological disorders, learning differences and cognitive dysfunctions, among others.

Happy Hanukkah!

10 - 18 December 2020

Hanukkah is a Jewish festival commemorating the re-dedication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire. The word ‘Hanukkah’ means ‘Dedication’ in Hebrew. It is also known as the Festival of Lights, Chanukah and the Feast of Dedication.

Some common Hanukkah traditions include:

  • Lighting the Menorah. On each night of Hanukkah, Jewish families light a candelabra called the menorah. The menorah has one central candle called the shammus and eight additional candles–four on each side. Each night the family adds one candle to the menorah moving from right to left and then lights the candles that are in place from left to right. The act is meant to symbolize each of the eight nights that the lantern burned in the temple. Every night the shammus candle is lit while the family recites prayers.
  • Eating Fried Foods. Fried potato pancakes called latkes, fried sufganyot jelly-filled pastries and other fried foods are usually eaten during Hanukkah as a reminder of the oil that lit the lantern.
  • Spinning Dreidels. Small spinning tops are often played with during Hanukkah celebrations. The tradition arises from the fact that the Jews living under Antioch’s rule often pretended to gamble with the tops while they were actually reading the torah.
  • Eating Chocolate Coins. Chocolate coins wrapped in gold foil are often eaten as treats at Hanukkah. The coins are meant to symbolize the fact that after the Maccabees won independence for Israel, Jewish Kings were able to return to power and mint money.
  • Exchanging Gifts. While gift giving is not as important to Hanukkah as it is to Christmas, many families will exchange one gift per night throughout the holiday.

Communication in the Glaucoma Clinic

16 - 16 December 2020

Join Glaucoma UK’s upcoming digital glaucoma support group with Mr Mike Smith, Glaucoma Specialist from the Royal and Exeter Foundation Trust. In this session, Mike will be talking about communication in the glaucoma clinic and you will have the opportunity to ask him questions about how to get the most out of your appointment. For more details click here